All Reviews and Photos

Reviews, Photos, and Interviews from Various Productions

AS JACOB MARLEY IN A CHRISTMAS CAROL:

One scene in particular, in the middle of Act 1, involving Scrooge’s dead partner, Jacob Marley (Andrew Sellon), returned from the spirit world, wrapped in chains, to confront Scrooge about his miserly ways, is an impressive technical feat.  I don’t think I’ve ever seen a fly system used better on the Hanover stage.

 — Telegram.com

The four ghosts do a marvelous job in this show. Andrew Sellon as Marley flies into Scrooge’s home, scaring the audience. He wears chains as he flies on top of Scrooge’s bed with a smoke filled haze and colorful lighting. The spectacular flying effects are handled with the help of California-based company, ZFX Inc.

 — TheatreMirror.com

 

Photo by Scott Erb; courtesy of Troy Siebels and Stacey Leigh O’Dell from The Hanover Theatre’s 2012 Production

 

 

 

 

AS NIKOLA TESLA IN THE DANGERS OF ELECTRIC LIGHTING:

 

 

 

 

The performances in The Dangers of Electric Lighting live up the play’s title. Every single one is electric!  Andrew Sellon as Tesla is restrained, formal, tenacious and passionate about his art, operating on the moral high ground. Impeccably dressed in contrast to Edison’s slovenliness, Sellon’s Tesla is the sophisticated and knowledgeable underdog. The audience’s empathy for Tesla is palpable.

The Dangers of Electric Lighting at Shadowland Theatre is as brilliant as the illumination emanating from a light bulb powered by Tesla’s Alternating Current.

 — The Catskill Chronicle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


AS GIDGER IN THE VIOLET HOUR:

Andrew Sellon often steals the show as the effeminate Gidger, a man who is bursting to come out at a time when men couldn’t.

Although most of what happens when the machine starts taking over the office is troubling, there are several comic moments, most provided by Gidger, who begins to speak and behave as the man he might have been had he lived several decades in the future.  NY Theater Wire. 

 

The standouts for me were Heather Lee Harper, who never lets Rosamund’s spoiled rich girl frivolity cover up the depth of her true feeling; and Andrew Sellon as the much-put-upon Gidger, who provides most of the comic relief with near-flawless timing.  Broadway World 

 

AS A MULTITUDE OF CHARACTERS IN THE 39 STEPS:
(Maltz Jupiter Theatre)

This production should be nominated for a few prestigious Florida Carbonell Awards for Sound Design, Direction and Best Ensemble for a play. A Theatre Chat top pick! One of the best of the 39 Steps productions to date.  This cast could be on any Broadway stage.  — The Examiner

SEE THE 39 STEPS PHOTO GALLERY AND READ MORE REVIEWS HERE!

 

AS CHARLOTTE, DOUG AND ALL 33 OTHER CHARACTERS IN I AM MY OWN WIFE
(Vermont Stage Company)

Andrew Sellon won a lot of fans in 2005 with his engaging performance as the title character in the Vermont Stage production of the comedic play “The Foreigner.” He’ll be winning a lot more fans in the coming days with his latest impressively versatile Vermont Stage role as a really foreign foreigner…..It’s the rare one-actor play that doesn’t feel like a one-actor play, but his performance is so varied, it’s easy to forget he’s going it alone.   — Burlington Free Press

I Am My Own Wife calls for one actor to play 35 characters and conjure a virtuosic range of accents and emotions — all while wearing a dress. Andrew Sellon excelled at every aspect of the demanding role….Sometimes it was hard to remember that the palpable presence of every character came from just one actor.  — Seven Days

MORE WIFE REVIEWS, PHOTOS & INTERVIEWS
 

 

AS THE FOOL IN KING LEAR
(Vermont Stage Company and NY Classical Theatre Company)

Andrew Sellon also gave real dimension to Lear’s Fool, the only character able to speak the truth.  — Times Argus

[Donald] Grody [Lear] also demonstrated how Lear never loses his internal spark, as evidenced by his spirited bantering with the Fool (played sensitively by Andrew Sellon). — Seven Days

Grody displays flashes of humor, especially in scenes with his trusted Fool (Andrew Sellon).  The cast surrounding Grody rises to his standard.  — Burlington Free Press

Acting as a nursemaid and scolding schoolteacher, the Fool (Andrew Sellon) doles out tonics to calm Lear while chastising him through humor and logic, the only way to avoid offending him. Sellon also infuses genuine concern for Lear, worrying about his physical and mental health, desperate to keep him from harm; he is a fool by trade, a caregiver by loyalty and love.  — PlayShakespeare.com

 

MORE LEAR REVIEWS, PHOTOS & INTERVIEW

 

 

 

AS WAYNE IN INSPECTING CAROL
(Vermont Stage Company)

Andrew Sellon, who has become a mainstay lead actor in VSC productions, took Wayne through a hilarious series of transformations. The shy deer in the headlights became an eager beaver once on stage, but ultimately morphed into a Tasmanian devil who destroys everything in his path. It was a similar role to Sellon’s 2005 performance as Charlie in The Foreigner — and rendered just as brilliantly. — Seven Days

This fast-paced production, directed by Mark Nash, Vermont Stage’s artistic director, benefits from a stellar comic performance by Andrew Sellon as Wayne, who tries to turn the tables when he discovers he wasn’t hired for his acting ability.  With a look and attitude of oblivious innocence reminiscent of Stan Laurel of the legendary Laurel and Hardy comedy team, Sellon is a master of comic timing.  — Times Argus

Standouts include Sellon (a hit in the previous Vermont Stage Productions of “The Foreigner” and “I Am My Own Wife”), who is not only a good actor, he’s good at portraying a bad actor. — Burlington Free Press
 

 

  

AS VLADIMIR IN WAITING FOR GODOT
(Vermont Stage Company)

I’ve seen Waiting for Godot many times; some productions had music — tubular bells! — and some had Chaplinesque clowns.  But Vermont Stage Company’s poignant rendition has them all beat.  Four strong actors — no weak links here — largely determine the success of this stark drama.

Vladimir, nicknamed Didi, takes subtle shape with Andrew Sellon’s deft range of emotional expressions, from red-eyed worry to big-smiling bravado.  Didi nurtures and enables his memory-challenged buddy Estragon, or Gogo, a clownish, mindless character caught vividly by Steven Hauck.  The pair’s perfectly timed repartee is outstanding, never missing a beat, and moves the play seamlessly from comedy to tragedy and back again.  — Seven Days

MORE GODOT REVIEWS, PHOTOS & INTERVIEW
 

 

 

 

AS CHARLIE IN THE FOREIGNER
(Productions at Vermont Stage Company, the Public Theatre, ME and Shadowland Theatre, NY):
 

“Little guy wins over villains” has proven to be not only a feel-good plot for comedy writers, but it also provides a vehicle for showing off the talents of an engaging actor.  Andrew Sellon is such a performer, and he is at the top of his craft in the current production of “The Foreigner”.      — Times Herald Record, NY

Much of the credit for the success of the show goes to Andrew Sellon as Charlie.  His early Charlie is perfectly overwrought, wide-eyed and mousy, a shy man who jumps at every second and never sits or stands straight up.  Later, he becomes a happier Charlie, a man who connects to other people in a positive way, and who discovers strengths and abilities he didn’t know he had.            — Portland Press Herald, ME

VERMONT STAGE FOREIGNER REVIEWS, PHOTOS & INTERVIEW
 

 

 

IN VERMONT STAGE COMPANY’S ORIGINAL WINTER TALES

Actor Andrew Sellon told Vermont author Chris Bohjalian’s very personal “Miss Jasmine’s Secret Santa.” Told from a schoolboy’s point of view, it told how a schoolboy transformed his distraught teacher’s life with the simplest of gifts – and Sellon’s expressive telling made it seem very real.

Barre Montpelior Times Argus

Bohjalian’s “Miss Jasmine’s Secret Santa,” read with the right balance of controlled whimsy by Andrew Sellon, details the narrator’s crush on his lonely, divorced sixth-grade teacher, and how his simple gift to his troubled object of love might just have given each of them something to last a lifetime.

Burlington Free Press

 

AS PRIOR IN ANGELS IN AMERICA
(Gallery Players, NY)

The production is most especially blessed with a stellar cast.  Sellon slides from sophisticated humor to pathetic entreaty with admirable grace. — The Park Slope Paper

The character of Prior carries the weight of the play’s theme even as he resists being the chosen messenger, and Andrew Sellon effectively worked the pathos and the humor. — Off-Off-Broadway Review (www.oobr.com)

Yes, I saw the original, and with this company, in this closer space, and even (or maybe especially) without some of the machinery and effects, the Gallery production is a good deal more informing, engaging and powerful.  I can only repeat superlatives for all the cast. — Clark Gessner, Park Slope Press
 

 

AS DR. RANCE IN WHAT THE BUTLER SAW
(Forum Theatre, NJ)

Andrew Sellon has a gleeful, wicked time with Dr. Rance. — The New York Times

The performing cast is excellent, and particular mention should go to Andrew Sellon as Dr. Rance.  Sellon unveils a slight resemblance to Eric Idle (of Monty Python fame) but bounds about the stage much like Groucho Marx.  — Somerset Messenger-Gazette

Sellon delivers a smashing, high-speed sketch of jargon-ridden mania.  — The Star-Ledger
 

AS MOZART IN AMADEUS
(Playhouse 22, NJ)

Andrew Sellon’s Mozart is a performance to be savored.  Convincing both as a musical prodigy and as a perpetual adolescent, he brings an inspired innocence to his character that is a joy to watch.  — The Home News

Andrew Sellon as Mozart is loud, brash, childish and possesses an annoying laugh which tends to get on the audience’s nerves — exactly as it is supposed to.  His cocky portrayal of a genius who knows he’s a genius moves smoothly from the comic to the pathetic.  Mozart’s gradual slip into insanity is frightening and convincing, and his death scene is effective. — The Daily Targum

The play is brightened when Andrew Sellon as Mozart and Donna Manfredi as his wife, Constanze, are on stage.  They play together beautifully, and Mr. Sellon has caught the manic energy of the possessed composer. — The Princeton Packet
 

AS BAZZARD IN THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD
( Forum Theatre, NJ)

Andrew Sellon wins considerable audience sympathy with his innocent and sweet charm as the nondescript Bazzard, doing more with that role than one would imagine.  — The New York Times

Another audience favorite was Andrew Sellon as Bazzard. — Metuchen-Edison News

 

 

 

AS THE 1ST GRAVEDIGGER IN HAMLET
(PlayMakers Repertory, NC)

Andrew Sellon, who doubles as the Ghost, makes a sparkling Gravedigger, playing his pun-full dialogue for all the laughs, or groans, it’s worth.  — Durham Herald-Sun

Andrew Sellon and Ronda Music — as the garrulous gravedigger and his sidekick — were excellent in their roles. — Sanford Herald

The gravediggers from the graveyard scene were particularly funny, and deserve mention. — N.C. Beacon

 

 

AS LEWIS CARROLL IN THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS DARKLY

Sellon succeeded wonderfully in showing many sides of Carroll’s character.  Sellon relies heavily, but not too heavily, on Carroll’s own words.  One who was not intimately familiar with Carroll’s writings would never notice the seams between what Sellon has written and what he has taken from Carroll.  Sellon’s enactment of what might have happened had Rev. Dodgson [Carroll’s real name] had tea with the Liddells to propose a match with Alice is wonderful — he never says that this is what happened, yet one must believe that, if it did happen, it would have been something like what we saw. — the Knight Letter (official magazine of the Lewis Carroll Society of North America)